Coaching with POSITIVITY! In life, at work, with teams.

Mastering the Art of Coaching: Insights on Career Shift, Growth, and Personal Development with Angelos Derlopas

September 04, 2023 Angelos Derlopas
Coaching with POSITIVITY! In life, at work, with teams.
Mastering the Art of Coaching: Insights on Career Shift, Growth, and Personal Development with Angelos Derlopas
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Here's a real treat for everyone who's fascinated by the transformative potential of coaching! Picture this: a highly respected MCC coach, Angelos Derlopas, who has reached the mastery level and has even become a coaching supervision supervisor with the EMCC, sits down to share his captivating journey. Angelos takes us from his early fascination with relationships and people skills, through his corporate management phase, and onto the 'calling' that pulled him into the realm of coaching. It's an enthralling tale of growth and development, as Angelos recounts how he gradually fell in love with coaching and relentlessly deepened his knowledge and skills.

But wait, there's more! In a surprising twist, Angelos reveals the hurdles he had to jump when switching careers. He dispels the myth that career changes are a breeze and instead, talks about the reality of the challenge, and how he built an armor to ward off naysayers, armed himself with mindfulness, and maintained a positive outlook. Plus, he gives us a glimpse of the cultural differences he encountered and the necessity of organizing his thoughts, passions and resources. Angeloos' insights on the importance of a diverse team are sure to leave you mulling over your own skill sets.

Now, let's pivot to the power of connection and positive feedback in coaching. Angelos and I delve into the complexities of the Great Reset and its bearing on our roles as coaches and trainers. We also consider the title for his autobiography, 'Dreams Are My Reality', and Angelos shares his thoughts on how coaching can enable change rather than imposing it. This conversation is packed with enlightening reflections on coaching, career shifts, and personal growth that you won't want to miss. So, plug in those earbuds, and get ready for an episode that's sure to spark some serious thought.

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Speaker 1:

We go much more in depth. We understand that there is much more to it, like you think. No at all. But then there's another ocean having you, yes.

Speaker 2:

Well, listen to Hart here, your host for the coaching studio, and welcome to the studio. I am very excited to introduce a person who I've known for quite a while. A consider a friend, Angeloos Diller-Bosch, and he is an MCC coach with the International Coaching Federation as well as being a coaching supervision supervisor with the EMCC. So Angeloos hails from Greece and coming from such a long way away, Angeloos, thank you so much for being on the coaching studio today.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for inviting me, lipsi. I really feel like a friend, like an old friend, with you and while we let my little one to take a picture, I'm very happy to be here.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was thinking. The last time I saw you like was when we met in Prague, I think, where we were both there for the coaching converge conference.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, like I yes, I had recently. So that's what it was. We met in Prague, we met in Warsaw, so all European places and Warsaw, I mean when we were the chapter president. So we're going to make up the global leaders for right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah that's right in Warsaw. So, yeah, well, you have to come to the United States, apparently, because we need to meet on my turf occasionally. So, angeloos, thank you so much again for being here, and I think I kind of give you a little snippet about sort of really the curiosity being about you and your coaching development and really this movement that you made from even finding coaching towards moving towards mastery level coaching. I would love to hear a bit of your story.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, lisa. I'm a little bit straight and I'm happy to say hello to you, please, shane, because I don't know, because it's true, I guess I think that there was a kind of calling. So I had my previous career before coaching the profession it was, I was manager in different corporations, so you could say that on the one hand, it was very, very it's organically developed as the need to acquire people skills. When you're managing people, you need people skills. So coaching is the right place to go on the one hand.

Speaker 1:

But, as I said earlier, it was a kind of coupling because, as far back as I can remember myself, when I was growing up, I was really enjoying the kind of friendship when you have these deep conversations and I was getting that feedback in many ways that there was something happening there. I was very, I was so interested just being there, holding that place, as we say right now, because you know, when you're young you don't have this kind of word, you don't have the words that you can understand that there is something happening there. We get into space for the other and making a connection and then trying to observe and understand. How does that person feel? Where does that person, how does he or she organize themselves and work their way through their life? What's important to them? You know the things that we call values in coaching and how they can create different outcomes. How can they change what is happening in their lives and their families?

Speaker 1:

Back then, very young, that was one of the most important issues, right. So I felt like this was a calling and at some point and then, as we experienced that, it's like we just become a dormant situation and then at some point, gradually, there are things that are happening that are working that in you and that personal development, personal growth, is important to you. So you could follow in number of locations and you can understand that this is meaningful for you. So, luckily, coaching came to my awareness. So at some point, when it was the right way I guess, I started coaching and that felt like the natural place for me, like where I was meant to be, like the right conversations, being in the right place and having the right extensions where you had the conversation.

Speaker 2:

That felt very, that resonated with me, that actually Well and I love this idea of this thing, of it's really dormant inside of you that really started to emerge. And then you found coaching and it just really resonated with the place that you were emerging into. I think that's beautiful. You said something else and it reminded me of something I said to myself when I was probably about 27 years old, 25 years old, and I remember saying to myself I want to ask a more important question than the ones that I was asking as a waitress, and so that was the thing that moved me into graduate school and then ultimately towards therapy and then coaching.

Speaker 2:

But this idea of this emergence I really resonate with myself. So this emergence of wanting to be in a different kind of relationship with the people around us also that's beautiful. And then, as you got into coaching, what was it that had you move towards MCC? Because a lot of people come into coaching for a myriad of similar reasons of this emergence of this new way of being and the work that they're doing with themselves, but they don't necessarily choose to become somebody who's studied enough and done all the required trainings and mentorship and all the things required for mastery. What was the driver for you towards mastery?

Speaker 1:

Well, you could say that one, on the one hand, is because I do to put the boss. I want to be as best as I can, but on the other hand, to be honest, I fell in love with that thing and every well, not every day, but every year I was attending a number of trainings and I wanted to learn more. And it was not just a need or somewhere in that picture. Somewhere it was that I was in love, but I was still in love and I was receiving love. This was something that felt home. It was something that felt like the answer to I'm not going to let you say when you were waiting for something.

Speaker 1:

At some point you realized that there must be other questions, that you can ask people and that you want to ask better questions. So you want to put you when you start coaching. I remember myself back then. I realized that then, the more competent they became, the more stage they made. The coaching I provided was taking away that I was certain that when I do X, the result would be Y and not something close to Y, so that becoming more competent is usually achieving the accurate results, knowing exactly what to do. It's like masterly of health you want the things out of it. You are good at it and you want to become better at it. You have to not be the thing for everyone.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don't know if it is the same for everyone, but it definitely speaks to you and I also align with that idea of falling in love with something and then wanting to continue to grow and develop that craft of how we are with people. When you said something interesting and I think I heard you correctly which was, as you became better at your craft, you actually became safer in the coaching container because you understood the questions that you were asking and the outcome. This maybe even speaks to positivity coaching, but you are not leading the person towards the situation or towards something negative, I'm guessing here. So I would love to have your thoughts about how that created more safety and more structure. Maybe isn't the right word, but I'm just going to launch this at you here Hot potato, go with that.

Speaker 1:

I know it's hot potato, even the notion that you must feel comfortable, to feel uncomfortable, it's only the muscle. You have to learn that and you have to practice that. And if you know better your methodology and else if you, as you practice, you reflect, you study, you understand, you notice yourself and you understand what is happening for you as your coaching with someone else in the room. When I say safe, I don't mean that I am opting for mechanic coaching or robotic coaching. That's not my style.

Speaker 1:

However, I think one of the things that are important for people and I remember when I was explaining it to people who were expressed some kind of interest in training, in training, coaching, playing themselves and there were some of them were saying that I hope, in my capacity as a leader, as a manager and so on, I'm doing some kind of coaching, but I want to learn it better. So what do you think that I will learn better here? Any convincing thing that felt convincing for me that the parent kid was convincing for them as well, but it could be more safe. You'll know exactly what to do. You will know what to do. You will learn your craft. So it means you will become more competent.

Speaker 2:

To put it in simpleized technology yes, more competent, and I think also there's an element of confidence right Also, as you have that comfort level. Somebody says something, and maybe they say a lot of some things, because often clients will come to us with like a huge download of information and that confidence to not be overwhelmed by that, to tug on the threads that are maybe most important out of what they've shared, so that we are most useful also not just competent, but confident to be useful I think that's the thing that's showing up as you speak.

Speaker 1:

Confidence. Confidence is always important. The right amount of confidence, right, the kids know. Overly confident, not arrogant, but confident, yes, it is important. And confidence in what you're doing and being resourceful and being. The more that you know, the more experience you have. You are becoming more flexible, more agile, so you can deliver better results, yes, and then it gets better and it gets better and it gets better, because there are a lot of times when people say I need to say that a couple of times in the past, I'm aware of that or I know that, and then something happens and you do more of the paperwork and then you go much more in depth and you can understand that there is much more to it. I think you think no way all, but then there's another ocean heading you.

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

There's so much.

Speaker 2:

That's right, you made it to the moon, but there's, like stars and planets beyond. Exactly I know.

Speaker 1:

I think it's competent, surely, with one hand, that on the other hand, you're moving to mastery, and I don't know if you have experience, but I think so a company already created and it's just so much change. And now I am there in the end to see. I think a lot of things that have changed for me is that I enjoyed more. Now I enjoyed more. It's not, of course, great for the client, I guess, especially the judges. From my first experience and I'm willing to go and have experience with an NCC coach One of the things that was very impressive for me is that I didn't quite realize went into the conversation story. I thought, whoa, we already started. It felt so organic.

Speaker 2:

Right, yes, so there's this sort of again the weaving of the competencies in such a way that it is a natural feeling conversation, not a stilted or scripted kind of conversation, but a really natural, meaningful conversation. Yes, what would you say is your biggest a-ha of what you didn't know when you started to where you are now and what you know to be true for you about your coaching?

Speaker 1:

But my coaching comdicacy or the coaching of the profession, or anything.

Speaker 2:

You shifted like when you began, you didn't know what you didn't know, and now you may still not know what you don't know, but you know something different than you did when you started.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm very well. You would expect that there are a number of our files, but I'm just, you know, thinking right now from the top of my head. I would think at some point I became. One important hide was when I became aware that of the potential that I have, but if I let go, there's so much more to do and so much more to create, and it was something you know that it's not. It is meaningful for me and I don't know if well, it's. Another viewers came or it's made without a. There was a threshold when I understood that, okay, there is so much more and I cannot unleash that. There's so much more and the more I allow them to get on the field and the stage and do the, the practice, wonderful things are coming up.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know it. Really you had said you were having more fun earlier and then this state of being in this kind of open curiosity and and just allowing kind of like your own emergence, right Like it was dormant there, but then it emerged, and the emergence and a conversation of maybe what's meaningful, if I'm understanding you correctly.

Speaker 1:

Yes, you're right, something that is meaningful, and you realize that there's, there are so many other things that she can create, that she can experiment and same creates to create and create again, because, obviously, to to being allowed to be, to allow yourself to be created and to find the context to be creative, to find the opportunity to become creative, to exercise the creativity, and then you know, of course, try to understand that the more that you do, the more your practice, the better it becomes, the better you become. So it's, you know, creates more by itself.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that it's kind of like that wheel of growth of you know, that wheel that is churning of growth, and you think back and and I guess the question that I'm that's showing up right now is really, when you think back, what was the most challenging element of this, this journey that you've been on, for you as a human being, becoming right?

Speaker 1:

The more challenging, the more challenging, the more challenging changing career, because maybe.

Speaker 2:

yeah, what was the challenging piece of? Because if that was really challenging, I'd love to hear, like, what was challenging about changing your career and how did you navigate that?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well, yeah, thank you. That is an interesting question and there are training people who become coaches and some of them, you know, are considered to start the low private practice. It's always a challenge to shift, to change careers, shift careers. I don't know about the state, but it might be a cultural thing. But I understand a lot of people where I live thrown upon anyone who changes careers, the version, the kind of mindset that you should the only choose career once, you should Forever Right. So it's like you need to, you need to find the out, need Very excited to be, because you understand that when you start initiating a change, you're not sure yourself either.

Speaker 1:

Really, you are, you're done, reasonable to expect others to support you when they don't know and you don't know exactly whether you will be good at it or not like you're still experimenting. You had an idea, you have a happy idea, you become passionate about that and you want to move forward and it might hit the success or it might be the failure. I think the challenge about the possible failure in the future is well with the challenge, for organizations and and individuals as well. So I think this was my main challenge. I had to really put an armor around so that I won't be easy to be influenced by. You know other voices. I want to hold you down and understand that it's difficult. It's not an easy way to go forward, especially when you don't know and you're more busy. Also, leave down now, move something that you have not done.

Speaker 1:

You don't know that, so yeah trying to yeah, you don't know how that works, you don't know how the gigs looking professional and you do not follow. Good, you will be when you will practice in this location so there are a number of issues to take into consideration.

Speaker 1:

So I think what this was my biggest challenge and I think that one of the things that helped me find my strength is there's a mindful depositivity when you try to try to to find out which are the places, the things, the resources need, the idea, the mindset that you can, that that can hold you, that can help you know, lift your head and you know a lot of your spine and go forward. And it's not all easy, because sometimes it feels like you're walking and moving and you want to be caught constantly, aware that you always need to look at what are the possible choices in opportunities here, not focus too much on the obstacles pretty much what you think.

Speaker 2:

Coaching you know it's interesting. Yeah, pretty much the same thing. Yeah, there's a couple things that you said that I think are really important to highlight, because I do think there's probably cultural elements where you come from a culture that says you were born, you were born, you created this career, you will now be in that career forever and there's no changes allowed. And I think a lot of, a lot of cultures are shifting that ideology a bit. But I think there are a lot of cultures that are like you've got to decide forever when you're, you know, 18 or 24 or something and I think. But even in cultures like the culture that I come from, where most people will have three to five careers right, so I mean, it isn't unknown for a person to move from, like I did, from being a waitress to being, you know, artists, to being a social worker, to being a coach, you know, like that was acceptable within my culture. It was still. You know, as you're talking, there's still the challenge of I don't know if I'm good enough. I don't know, even with all the training and all the money I'm investing in this education, that it will ever turn into anything that will support me. Gosh, it would be so much easier if I could just get a job and work for somebody else where I know the paycheck will just come in.

Speaker 2:

And I think there is a lot of stepping through that doorway into that liminal space of not knowing that entrepreneurs often are struggle with in a career change like this into coaching. So I really I really respect the the struggle because I think I've experienced and probably still do. I mean it's different now than it was when I first started. But there were just remarks and felt like years where I'm like am I doing the right thing or should I cut bait and go somewhere else and do something different? And so that ability to kind of use that positive mindset or just even a rational mindset of clear expectations of like what is my expectation of how fast this is gonna shift and move and how long it actually takes like you've built a school I mean that didn't happen in six months. That took years probably to really develop and continue working on and building out and and and and you know finding people who would come to the school and all of that sort of stuff easier today than it probably was when you first started.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, I mean the challenge is real, struggle is real yes, and you understand, in that process, as you're doing, that you will, you discover your, your training. And you know, until I had first trained as that's my first beat, I would never I had not done that, I would be ever thought that that would be, that I could stand in front of people training them, and then I would never even thought that I would so much in doing that. And I think, from that moment on, when you get you know, when I, when I look back, sometimes I said I I could have been crazy those years because I've been able to change it very quickly. But I guess there's perhaps for me that's one of the things that I was always good, you know, the night and I had that experience, skillful, and you have held, organized that and it kind of kick, well, not exactly like that, but not over that. You know it doesn't happen overnight, but yes, of course it's. I think you trust your hard work and you go passion and how will you organize it?

Speaker 2:

yeah, I think that's a really good point too, which is how how well you organize things as well as do you surround yourself with people who have a skill set maybe you don't so that you can be organized? I honestly have to have somebody to help me, because sometimes I'm the opposite of organized. I'm like chaos some days and not like organization. You know, when you think about the work that you're doing in your coaching as you continue to grow and develop, where is your focus of attention in your own coaching today?

Speaker 1:

and in my own coach in it to develop coaching techniques and share those and to a fully it's been interested in, focused on the quality and quality standards and then. So this was one of my interests in all the all the time that have been engaged at different occasions and as well as the professional and with our coaching techniques. So I'm always yet not just what other minimum standards, but what I think is very essential and will be help the sufficient, be credible and help the trainee be fully equipped with what he, she, has to deal with when he's working with one.

Speaker 2:

I was just thinking like what is like one of those quality standards. That is like that you are really focusing your energy on.

Speaker 1:

I believe that the quality of the training needed, receiving from the school kind of mentoring they are getting, and it's very, very important. So I had provided supervision for a long period of time and of course I had to get experience. I had to try to, and we organized the community of coaches so that I would allow the creation of what we call cross-pollination, so that they can get different perceptions and borrow other people's experiences. That will help them catalyze their understanding and their progress in the coaching and their coaching study.

Speaker 2:

I think that's so important. I mean, I really heard you say three things that is really around the quality of the education that you get, the quality of the mentorship that you get, and the quality or the, rather the and hopefully quality also. But that you're also in some reflective, practice-like supervision that you're really looking at and exploring your relationship to your work. You know, I think all three of those things are so important.

Speaker 2:

I do a lot of I-C-F PCC assessments right now and I'm the thing that is most surprising to me, that is consistent between the people who pass and don't pass, is that you can tell that the people who pass have gotten good mentorship. They didn't just have a chit chat with somebody who also had a higher credential than them and just sort of chat about coaching, but they really dove into their questions and into the work of what their coaching conversations were looking like. Because that's how you move from just having a wandering conversation to actually demonstrating coaching at a PCC level. And I had gone through this supervision program with Coach Supervision Academy, not last year but the year before, and I cannot even slightly under-emphasize the value of the reflective practice in our work. So I'm so glad you brought both of those forward so glad.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I know what you're saying, because I was trained by the same people that you were trained about in London.

Speaker 2:

Nice, yeah, yeah, and it's an amazing process to go through getting Coach Supervision training also, even if you're never going to be a Coach Supervision partner with anybody but rather the process of that self-reflection in your coaching, like where do you get hooked? Where is their transference and counter-transference? Where is there? You know where we get, want to save people and keep them from ever being challenged or have a hard feeling or anything. You know? Like what is all that stuff that shows up in the space between two human beings? I think it's just, it's just so incredibly important. Were you going to say something?

Speaker 1:

Well, I guess when you're, let's say, home or reflective skills, then you can, you know, you could use that into your mental coaching. And I think that was, I remember, back in the days when we were a little bit, or at least in the early days. So I think that back then I was pushing up to create some kind of credentials for mental coaching and this still has not been done, although being a very low situation with what are the requirements or not exactly requirements, but I would say suggestions what would make a good mentor coach. I think it's, it's progressed in that and I believe that there's a lot to be done and I don't want to fiddle and it's working because, as she said, you cannot just believe that because you are a good good in coaching, that means that you can be good in mentor coaching, or that you can be a good coach, trainer and so on.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know, it's so interesting too. I had a conversation when I was doing a mental coaching session with somebody and I had taken the transcript of what they had sent me and I was just listening to it. They had not done a transcript, but I was capturing the words as they, as I was listening to the recording, and there was this thing that the coach stepped over that the client had brought forward. And when I mentioned it to the coach like what had you stepped over X? They were like that didn't happen. I never would have stepped over that and so and so.

Speaker 2:

That's the other thing about like really looking at your work and seeing on in black and white on a page what was said, what you heard, what you asked, is just crucial to developing your ear for what you're listening for, because I think there's so many places where we just listen over things, because that isn't where our attention is right, like that's normal. But but if you're going to be a good mentor coach, how are you supporting people to have better self awareness of what their coaching is? Yeah, yeah, well, when you think about this idea of some sort of you know, I don't know what the word is exactly but when you're looking at mentor coaching and you're thinking of having a more robust expectation of mentor coaching. What does that look like in your mind?

Speaker 1:

Well, I think you have to be very clear about what is mentor coaching, what is assessing the assessed, who is the assessor, and whether the client needs, needs, needs one or the other and we want to pick out. Sometimes there's a confusion there for a reason that the thing that this isn't what's done on the one hand, and the other hand, I think that feedback is a difficult task, is difficult for to give it back and it's difficult to receive it better because you know you are humans, so that's right and I was perfect.

Speaker 2:

I was perfect. What are you talking about?

Speaker 1:

Right back at it.

Speaker 1:

So you want to create that space and you want to feel, to support your mentor coaching client, your main seat, to allow for and to be in that mindset.

Speaker 1:

So there are a number of things that you, which you can prepare your client and how it will be better for them to prepare themselves and come to that space. But I think the most, the biggest weight of the role we use, or you, the mentor coach, because you have to make a connection and this is very important, this is where you put your heart right. Make the connection so the other person will be inspired by you, so the other person will feel that you will care for them. So you create the space, so you are constantly aware and flexible and agile, so you can understand that it's too heavy for them. If you need to, it's down or on the things, and then you invite the other person to share that kind of awareness or share their part in co-creating this awareness of how we are dealing this together. A little bit not to what we are doing coaching, but very, very different, because we're not talking about the client here, we're talking about you, right.

Speaker 2:

Right yeah. And I think that we should never underestimate the power of shame aligned with feedback. Right Like that. I should have done it better. How did I miss that? Like all the negative narrative that shows up for people when they're getting, like what happened here? And they're like, oh my gosh, what happened? I don't know, I'm a terrible coach and like how do you move through that and see it just more as like what do you know? Now, as a result of having this newer awareness, like really shifting our relationship to feedback, I think that you know. I know I asked you what your biggest challenge was and I think you were fine with your biggest challenge, but I also think learning to receive feedback as positive was a big challenge for me also.

Speaker 1:

I don't know about for you, but I know it was for me that he did, but I think that so many of my clowns of my coaches line are having feedback as a real talent, so I don't feel that you know the whole world's there to you. It's going to my folder. There are a lot of us.

Speaker 2:

Yes, there's a lot of us Like rubber tummy, rubber heart. I'm okay, I'm okay, I'm okay, I'm okay, I'm okay. Angela, what are you up to in the world today? What are you, busy, busy in the world doing?

Speaker 1:

Well, they said, I'm so curious about all the different things that are being happening and how we can integrate that into coaching. So one of the big issues that has been in coaching world is diversity and inclusion and understand where. What is you, where we really stand, and not just, you know, jump on the train, because it never works, but I think I'm better than you know. My thinking was one of the issues that coaching can do something about that as well. But the new thing that is arising in my attention, and I think for other people as well, is what is happening in the post hopefully post-modern world, what we, what it's being called the great research, which is called by the World Economic Forum. So there are mindset that people who are seeing making choices differently.

Speaker 1:

And then we need to, as we are coaches or trainers or supervisors or mentors or whatever we we are yeah, no, no, no, no, all those different hats we are we need to be aware that there's a shift in the world and we need to Challenge yourself, getting made open, because the tide of the right changing. You know, the same thing on the left hand, and I think that's musical, because if you don't follow the deviate or if you don't, there will be my opinion that there will be challenge and there's a role or a part of the decision to change. So at some point you need to take sides. Well, I stated one of the most fascinating and inspiring commitments for right. There is a big social change and how far that somehow is a question we need to ask ourselves as a practitioner. So where do we want to send? But we need to be aware of what is really helping out there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, not with defensiveness, but with just open minded curiosity, so that we can actually choose differently. I'll be putting links to where viewers can find you, so I'll put in a bunch of different links for our conversation today. And this is my closing question. This is the thing I've been asking people off the top of your head. You don't need to explain it. But if you were writing your autobiography today, what would the title be?

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's a difficult one.

Speaker 2:

Of course it is.

Speaker 1:

Let me start from the first question People can find on the podcast and they can find a little bit of the name or a positive attitude.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to be putting all those links in, yet They'll find you easy. They'll just press a button.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and, of course, in the website. The website does all of our closing training school, which is positive to globalorg, and they can find the link to the podcast there as well, and spotted by Google's label and so on. So we go back to the question about the autobiography and it appears some that used to be a city when you were young. That's called the dreams of my reality, the old kind of reality or real planned, and I think we are doing this thing, we are coaches and we are so inspired and passionate about coaching. I think, based on the styles that we both shared here, I think your idea of coaching is a part of us and has also helped us in becoming who we are. So I think this allows us.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for reminding me I just reminded, connected with the big truth of my conditioning tree, that I realized really that what it's very important to me is to find the people that will allow me To change, develop and change and not to be changed these kind of things just to play a role. So coaching for that. So the main reason that I chose coaching for very, very personal thing was that it not only that it will allow me to change, but it will help me to get the opportunity to change to. You know, whatever it is all, they still sound. They still sound fascinating to me. So I think that the title of the autobiography could be the dreams of my reality.

Speaker 2:

Dreams are my reality. I love it. Thank you so much for being on the coaching studio today, angelos Gosh. I just really enjoyed our time together.

Speaker 1:

Me too. Thank you very much. It was great meeting you and answering these questions.

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